Choosing Your Kitchen Countertop

Photo by Mark Mahan Multimedia. This post is an adaptation from https://www.hgtv.com/design/remodel/kitchen-remodel/choosing-kitchen-countertops, not an original blog.

Choosing Your Kitchen Countertop

When choosing your kitchen countertop there are so many different options, but how do you know which is right for you?

Knowing that the countertop can be one of the most expensive portions of a kitchen remodel, you want to keep in mind popularity and affordability but also look beyond those. You’ll want to consider what is going to best reflect your style and be the right fit for how you want to use your kitchen.

The Pros and Cons

Granite comes in several grades (usually 1-5), patterns, colors, and thicknesses. Depending on the combination you choose this can cost anywhere from $25 a square foot to upwards of $1,000 a square foot. Another granite option to consider is Honed Granite, instead of a glass finish it gives you a soft matte look. But there are a couple things to consider for Honed Granit vs polished; it requires resealing more often, will stain easier, and it does cost more.

Pros

  • Due to the high-status of granite, choosing it will typically improve your homes resale value.
  • It is both heat and scratch resistant.
  • Low maintenance.
  • It is both natural and has a timeless appeal.

Cons

  • Due to its porosity it must be sealed occasionally as maintenance.
  • If it isn’t maintained properly you can end up with permanent stains.
  • Granite, though popular can often exceed budgets. But, if that’s a look you love you can go with something like quartz for less.

Quartz is often a popular choice. It is one of the hardest materials which gives it more durability and it will last longer than granite. Because they are manufactured the color and pattern combinations are limitless. They can even mimic the stone or granite look while giving you the benefits of quartz.

Pros

  • What you see in samples is what you will get upon delivery.
  • Mid-range cost.
  • No sealing is needed to maintain.
  • It is non-porous so resistant to stains and scratches.

Cons

  • The seams can be easier to see.
  • The consistence in pattern can make it look less like natural stone.

Soapstone is a natural stone that is both highly stain and bacteria resistant. It ranges in color from light to dark grey and will have subtle veining. It also doesn’t require sealing annually but regularly applying mineral oil will help disguise any scratches and enhance color depth over time.

Pros

  • Works for multiple design styles like modern, rustic, and traditional.
  • Low maintenance.
  • Non-porous.
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  • Doesn’t require sealing.
  • Stain-resistant.

Cons

  • Due to it being relatively soft, you can’t cut or drop things on it.

Marble is something that makes you think of elegant sculptures, but it can bring that same elegance to your kitchen as well. Marble comes in many textures and colors. It is one of the pricier options, though to get something for a better price consider Carrara marble. Being natural stone you do have to seal annually and it is a more high maintenance option so you need to take that into consideration. However, bakers have found marble countertops helpful if needing a cold surface to roll out bread or cookies.

Pros

  • Classic beauty with a high-end look.
  • Great option for bakers.
  • Multiple textures and colors.
  • Natural option.
  • Can add value to your home.

Cons

  • You need to seal regularly.
  • High maintenance.
  • Stains and scratches easily.
  • Very heavy.

Wood can be the finishing touch you need for a variety of different kitchen styles. It can go rustic with butcher block to classic with finished teak. Butcher block can add a lot of functionality for your food prep. Once you seal a wood countertop it is even sanitary to cut meat on and you can put your hot pots and pans on it because bonus, it’s heat resistant. A few varieties you can use are oak, walnut, maple, cherry, teak, and reclaimed wood. To take care of your wood countertops use mineral oil monthly and if you get a stain you can just sand it out and then re-oil.

Pros

  • Wood adds both beauty and warmth.
  • Variety of woods available.
  • Compatible with many different designs.

Cons

  • Must be sealed regularly to prevent staining.
  • You might need to refinish to combat wear and tear over time.
  • It is easier to damage than stone.

 

No matter what you choose or need, whether you are looking to add functionality, beauty or both to your home, the design team at J&R can help guide you in choosing the best countertop for YOU.